A 2nd year RN who just started work in the ED. This blog is nursing info, humor, healthcare, and medical science related. Some images and stories may be graphic and/or hilarious.

Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from cluelessmedic  179 notes
cluelessmedic:

kqedscience:

Paralysed man walks again after cell transplant
“A paralysed man has been able to walk again after a pioneering therapy that involved transplanting cells from his nasal cavity into his spinal cord.
Darek Fidyka, who was paralysed from the chest down in a knife attack in 2010, can now walk using a frame.
The treatment, a world first, was carried out by surgeons in Poland in collaboration with scientists in London.”
Learn more from bbcnews.

Hope we have actually nailed this, if so this is huuuuge news.

cluelessmedic:

kqedscience:

Paralysed man walks again after cell transplant

A paralysed man has been able to walk again after a pioneering therapy that involved transplanting cells from his nasal cavity into his spinal cord.

Darek Fidyka, who was paralysed from the chest down in a knife attack in 2010, can now walk using a frame.

The treatment, a world first, was carried out by surgeons in Poland in collaboration with scientists in London.”

Learn more from bbcnews.

Hope we have actually nailed this, if so this is huuuuge news.

howigotthrunursingschool:

semiotickitten:

apiratenhisprincess:

4ngelo:

theodorepython:

miami-tea:


The Defibrillator Toaster
My mom would be so annoyed… every morning I would run into the kitchen screaming “WE’RE LOSING THEM!!! BEEP BEEP BEEPBEEPBEEP!”
“DON’T YOU DIE ON ME, DAMNIT!!!  NURSE, WE NEED 12 CC’S OF CREAM CHEESE, STAT!!!”
He’s bread, Jim.
Time of deliciousness: 7:15 A.M
If we don’t restart his heart , he’s toast! 
JESUS CRUST.
JAM IT!
“Daddy’s in a butter place now, kids.”

I WASN’T EVEN GOING TO REBLOG UNTIL I SAW THE SHIT TON OF PUNS

HES BREAD JIM

JESUS CRUST

To pay my respects, Ill be sure to place a flour on his grave.

I need this.

All of these comments!!! HAHAHAHA!!

howigotthrunursingschool:

semiotickitten:

apiratenhisprincess:

4ngelo:

theodorepython:

miami-tea:

The Defibrillator Toaster

My mom would be so annoyed… every morning I would run into the kitchen screaming “WE’RE LOSING THEM!!! BEEP BEEP BEEPBEEPBEEP!”

“DON’T YOU DIE ON ME, DAMNIT!!!  NURSE, WE NEED 12 CC’S OF CREAM CHEESE, STAT!!!”

He’s bread, Jim.

Time of deliciousness: 7:15 A.M

If we don’t restart his heart , he’s toast! 

JESUS CRUST.

JAM IT!

“Daddy’s in a butter place now, kids.”

I WASN’T EVEN GOING TO REBLOG UNTIL I SAW THE SHIT TON OF PUNS

HES BREAD JIM

JESUS CRUST

To pay my respects, Ill be sure to place a flour on his grave.

I need this.

All of these comments!!! HAHAHAHA!!

Reblogged from mydoctorsdoctor  50 notes

sciencesourceimages:

What Is A Virus?

It seems that so many viruses have been in the news lately. The Ebola epidemic in Western Africa continues to worsen and has even wound up on our own doorstep. There’s been Norovirus on cruise ships and Enterovirus D68 in schools. Let’s not forget the resurgence of Measles and Mumps, which were long thought to have been eradicated in this country. What exactly is a virus and what does it do?

Below is the definition of a Virus from MedicineNet.com:

A virus is microorganism that is smaller than a bacterium and cannot grow or reproduce apart from a living cell. A virus invades living cells and uses their chemical machinery to keep itself alive and to replicate itself. It may reproduce with fidelity or with errors (mutations); this ability to mutate is responsible for the ability of some viruses to change slightly in each infected person, making treatment difficult.

See images of DNA Viruses

Viruses cause many common human infections and are also responsible for a number of rare diseases. Examples of viral illnesses range from the common cold, which can be caused by one of the rhinoviruses, to AIDS, which is caused by HIV. Viruses may contain either DNA or RNA as their genetic material. Herpes simplex virus and the Hepatitis B virus are DNA viruses. RNA viruses have an enzyme called reverse transcriptase that permits the usual sequence of DNA-to-RNA to be reversed so that the virus can make a DNA version of itself. RNA viruses include HIV and Hepatitis C virus.

See images of RNA Viruses

Researchers have grouped viruses together into several major families, based on their shape, behavior, and other characteristics. These include the Herpes-viruses, Adenoviruses, Papovaviruses (including the Papillomaviruses), Hepadnaviruses, Poxviruses, and Parvoviruses, among the DNA viruses. On the RNA virus side, major families include the picorna-viruses (including the Rhinoviruses), Calciviruses, Paramyxoviruses, Orthomyxoviruses, Rhabdoviruses, Filoviruses, and Retroviruses.

There are dozens of smaller virus families within these major classifications. Many viruses are host specific, capable of infecting and causing disease in humans or specific animals only.

Images above © James Cavallini / Science Source

Visit our images website

Visit our new video website

Reblogged from themidwifeisin  15 notes
How do you feel about people bed-sharing? I have done it practically since day 1 and I love it, but I tend to get negative reactions about it. However I've read that it is better then having the little one sleep alone. Is there really a better way or does it depend on the person?
Anonymous

themidwifeisin:

Read my post about baby sleep spaces here:

image

Then read through all the resources listed at the end of it.  It’s very important to do your own research on these very complicated issues.

Does anyone have an article about safe sleep that they love or an opinion they’re very committed to?

Reblogged from yahoonews  2,203 notes
yahoonews:

A day after the World Health Organization declared Nigeria free of Ebola, the doctor who treated the country’s first case of the deadly virus and later died from the disease herself is being hailed as a hero for helping stop the outbreak. Dr. Stella Ameyo Adadevoh, a doctor at First Consultant Hospital, oversaw treatment of Patrick Sawyer, Nigeria’s Ebola patient zero, when he arrived sick in Lagos, Nigeria’s former capital and Africa’s largest city, on a flight from Liberia in July.
Read more here.

yahoonews:

A day after the World Health Organization declared Nigeria free of Ebola, the doctor who treated the country’s first case of the deadly virus and later died from the disease herself is being hailed as a hero for helping stop the outbreak. Dr. Stella Ameyo Adadevoh, a doctor at First Consultant Hospital, oversaw treatment of Patrick Sawyer, Nigeria’s Ebola patient zero, when he arrived sick in Lagos, Nigeria’s former capital and Africa’s largest city, on a flight from Liberia in July.

Read more here.

Reblogged from icuisafourletterword  71 notes

The outbreak of Ebola, in Africa and in the United States, is a stark reminder of the clear and present danger that infection represents in all our lives, and we need reminding. Despite all of our medical advances, more familiar infections still take tens of thousands of American lives each year – and too often these deaths are avoidable. By

What will it take to reduce infections in hospitals? (via oupacademic)

Good read, but I would think frequently straight-catching patients would be more of a risk of infection than simply leaving the foley in place for a few days and providing frequent pericare.

(via icuisafourletterword)

Reblogged from nurseeyeroll  8,530 notes
scienceshenanigans:

Okay while this is true, we need to keep things in perspective.
The mortality rate of influenza in 2010 was 807.3 deaths per 100,000 people infected. That’s a 0.81% mortality rate. 
Contrast that with ebola, which now has a mortality rate of 70% in parts West Africa. That means that statistically speaking, 7 out of 10 people infected in those areas will die. Fortunately, Nigeria has been able to contain its outbreak and is now declared ebola-free.
Yes, lots of people die from the flu. But many, many more who are infected with ebola die from it. Ebola is more a more lethal disease; that’s just the facts. Fortunately for us, it’s harder to transmit. You can only contract the ebola virus through direct contact with infected bodily fluids. Current knowledge suggests the virus is not easily aerosolized, unlike influenza virus. 
So let’s keep a little perspective, shall we? 

scienceshenanigans:

Okay while this is true, we need to keep things in perspective.

The mortality rate of influenza in 2010 was 807.3 deaths per 100,000 people infected. That’s a 0.81% mortality rate. 

Contrast that with ebola, which now has a mortality rate of 70% in parts West Africa. That means that statistically speaking, 7 out of 10 people infected in those areas will die. Fortunately, Nigeria has been able to contain its outbreak and is now declared ebola-free.

Yes, lots of people die from the flu. But many, many more who are infected with ebola die from it. Ebola is more a more lethal disease; that’s just the facts. Fortunately for us, it’s harder to transmit. You can only contract the ebola virus through direct contact with infected bodily fluids. Current knowledge suggests the virus is not easily aerosolized, unlike influenza virus. 

So let’s keep a little perspective, shall we? 

Reblogged from mydoctorsdoctor  446 notes
ucsdhealthsciences:

Worse than EbolaBy now, the top false-color micrograph should be frighteningly familiar. It’s the Ebola virus, fear of which spreads faster than the actual pathogen. Below is something far more deadly – and even more familiar: the flu virus. While there is not yet a vaccine for Ebola, there is one for the flu – a simple, single shot that almost everyone should get. There’s even a nasal spray version for those afraid of needles.But millions of Americans each year do not get vaccinated. One reason is lethargy. Another is ignorance. Many myths surround the flu vaccine. National Public Radio recently cited 32.Here’s myth No. 1: You should fear Ebola more than the flu.Fact: The flu kills more people in a year in the United States than Ebola has killed in the history of the world.Go get vaccinated.

ucsdhealthsciences:

Worse than Ebola

By now, the top false-color micrograph should be frighteningly familiar. It’s the Ebola virus, fear of which spreads faster than the actual pathogen. Below is something far more deadly – and even more familiar: the flu virus.

While there is not yet a vaccine for Ebola, there is one for the flu – a simple, single shot that almost everyone should get. There’s even a nasal spray version for those afraid of needles.

But millions of Americans each year do not get vaccinated. One reason is lethargy. Another is ignorance. Many myths surround the flu vaccine. National Public Radio recently cited 32.

Here’s myth No. 1: You should fear Ebola more than the flu.

Fact: The flu kills more people in a year in the United States than Ebola has killed in the history of the world.

Go get vaccinated.