A 2nd year RN who just started work in the ED. This blog is nursing info, humor, healthcare, and medical science related. Some images and stories may be graphic and/or hilarious.

Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from breakingdownscience  350 notes

breakingdownscience:

bbsrc:

Signal may send cancer’s cellular factories into overdrive

A network of signals active in almost all types of cancer sends the protein factories in our cells into overdrive, and may help fuel a tumour’s uncontrolled growth, new research suggests.

Scientists at The Institute of Cancer Research, one of the world’s most influential cancer research institutes, identified a molecular trigger responsible for ramping up activity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) – the cellular factory that makes the building blocks cancer cells need to keep growing.

The findings may help to explain how cancer cells maintain their high levels of metabolism – and could uncover future targets for cancer treatment

The top three images show human hepatocarcinoma cells with the endoplasmic reticulum (blue) and nucleus (red). Copyright: Dr Chris Bakal, The Institute of Cancer Research, London.

The bottom image shows human epithelial cells from breast tissue treated with Torin, an inhibitor of TOR kinase, where the endoplasmic reticulum is (green), nuclei (red) and F-actin (grey) Copyright: Dr Chris Bakal, The Institute of Cancer Research, London.

Read more: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/health/2014/140709-pr-signal-may-send-cancer-into-overdrive.aspx

A network of signals active in almost all types of cancer sends the protein factories in our cells into overdrive, and may help fuel a tumour’s uncontrolled growth, new research suggests.”
THIS IS NOT NEWS.  THE NEWS IS HOW THIS PROCESS IS CONTROLLED (VIA THE TOR KINASE PATHWAY)

Reblogged from cacajao  28 notes
medicowesome:

Kawaii means cute in Japanese.Helps you remember Kawasaki’s disease, also known as mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome, with strawberry tongue, coronary artery aneurysms and Asian predisposition.That’s all!PS: I love Japanese culture & kawaii things :3I wanna visit Japan someday, wear a kimono, eat Sushi & Onigiri, color my hair pink, cosplay anime and watch cars drift ^__^I love how this post allowed me to express my love for Japan & calligraphy =D-IkaN

medicowesome:

Kawaii means cute in Japanese.
Helps you remember Kawasaki’s disease, also known as mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome, with strawberry tonguecoronary artery aneurysms and Asian predisposition.

That’s all!

PS: I love Japanese culture & kawaii things :3
I wanna visit Japan someday, wear a kimono, eat Sushi & Onigiri, color my hair pink, cosplay anime and watch cars drift ^__^
I love how this post allowed me to express my love for Japan & calligraphy =D

-IkaN

Reblogged from bonbonusagi  53 notes
medresearch:

Climate change may bring more kidney stones

As daily temperatures increase, so does the number of patients seeking treatment for kidney stones. In a study that may both reflect and foretell a warming planet’s impact on human health, a research team found a link between hot days and kidney stones in 60,000 patients in several U.S. cities with varying climates.
"We found that as daily temperatures rise, there is a rapid increase in the probability of patients presenting over the next 20 days with kidney stones," said study leader Gregory E. Tasian, M.D., M.Sc., M.S.C.E., a pediatric urologist and epidemiologist at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), who is on the staff of the Hospital’s Kidney Stone Center as well as the Hospital’s Center for Pediatric Clinical Effectiveness (CPCE).
Funding: Funds from the National Institutes of Health (grants HD060550 and DK70003), supported this study, along with a research fellowship from the Medical Research Council, U.K. In addition to their CHOP titles, Tasian and Keren are on the faculty of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
Read more

medresearch:

Climate change may bring more kidney stones

As daily temperatures increase, so does the number of patients seeking treatment for kidney stones. In a study that may both reflect and foretell a warming planet’s impact on human health, a research team found a link between hot days and kidney stones in 60,000 patients in several U.S. cities with varying climates.

"We found that as daily temperatures rise, there is a rapid increase in the probability of patients presenting over the next 20 days with kidney stones," said study leader Gregory E. Tasian, M.D., M.Sc., M.S.C.E., a pediatric urologist and epidemiologist at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), who is on the staff of the Hospital’s Kidney Stone Center as well as the Hospital’s Center for Pediatric Clinical Effectiveness (CPCE).

Funding: Funds from the National Institutes of Health (grants HD060550 and DK70003), supported this study, along with a research fellowship from the Medical Research Council, U.K. In addition to their CHOP titles, Tasian and Keren are on the faculty of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Read more

Reblogged from bonbonusagi  58,049 notes
scientific-women:

madscipanda:

anachoretique:

Walk through a giant 115 feet tall replica of the human body at the Corpus Science Museum in the Netherlands. Your Fantastic Voyage through the museum starts with an escalator ride into an open sore on your giant victim’s leg and ends among the pulsing neurons in his brain.  Explore the ventricles of the heart….

I want to go! :D 
jossmayfair ladieslovescience scientific-women

Field trip to the Netherlands! 

scientific-women:

madscipanda:

anachoretique:

Walk through a giant 115 feet tall replica of the human body at the Corpus Science Museum in the Netherlands. Your Fantastic Voyage through the museum starts with an escalator ride into an open sore on your giant victim’s leg and ends among the pulsing neurons in his brain.  Explore the ventricles of the heart….

I want to go! :D 

jossmayfair ladieslovescience scientific-women

Field trip to the Netherlands! 

Reblogged from bonbonusagi  671 notes

biomedicalephemera:

Our Three (Brain) Mothers

Protecting our brain and central nervous system are the meninges, derived from the Greek term for “membrane”. You may have heard of meningitis - this is when the innermost layer of the meninges swells, often due to infection, and can cause nerve or brain damage, and sometimes death.

There are three meningeal layers: the dura mater, arachnoid mater, and pia mater. In Latin, “mater” means “mother”. The term comes from the enveloping nature of these membranes, but we later learned how apt it was, because of how protective and essential the meningeal layers are.

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  • The dura mater is the outermost and toughest membrane. Its name means “tough mother”.

The dura is most important for keeping cerebrospinal fluid where it belongs, and for allowing the safe transport of blood to and from the brain. This layer is also water-tight - if it weren’t, our cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) would leak out, and our central nervous system would have no cushion! Its leathery qualities mean that even when the skull is broken, more often than not, the dura (and the brain it encases) is not punctured.

  • The arachnoid mater is the middle membrane. Its name means "spider-like mother", because of its web-like nature.

The arachnoid is attached directly to the deep side of the dura, and has small protrusions into the sinuses within the dura, which allows for CSF to return to the bloodstream and not become stagnant. It also has very fine, web-like projections downward, which attach to the pia mater. However, it doesn’t contact the pia mater in the same way as the dura: the CSF flows between the two meningeal layers, in the subarachnoid space. The major superficial blood vessels are on top of the arachnoid, and below the dura.

  • Pia mater is the innermost membrane, which follows the folds (sulci) of the brain and spinal cord most closely. Its name means “tender mother”.

The pia is what makes sure the CSF stays between the meninges, and doesn’t just get absorbed into the brain or spinal cord. It also allows for new CSF from the ventricles to be shunted into the subarachnoid space, and provides pathways for blood vessels to nourish the brain. While the pia mater is very thin, it is water-tight, just like the dura mater. The pia is also the primary blood-brain barrier, making sure that no plasma proteins or organic molecules penetrate into the CSF. 

Because of this barrier, medications which need to reach the brain or meninges must be administered directly into the CSF.

Images:
Anatomy: Practical and Surgical. Henry Gray, 1909.